Friday, 10 June 2011

We were at Crick

Jan and I drove across to Crick and spent Sunday at the show looking at stands and talking to various experts. 

Whilst walking around the pavilions we noticed two well behaved black Labrador's.  I stopped and enquired whether they were Fletcher and Floyd  from nb Caxton.  They were, and we had a brief conversation with Lesley.  We didn’t meet Joe as he appeared to be intently listening to a discussion regarding batteries.  So that’s another blogger and constant cruiser we have finally met.  We had intended to introduce ourselves to Doug and James on nb Chance but the path beside the show boats was packed and we decided against it!

On the way back to our accommodation we stopped beside the canal where I took a phone of a row of cottages with a pub at the far end.  Probably a very common scene for any UK readers but not something one would usually see in Australia.

I am very impressed with the courtesy of UK drivers.  They make gaps in the traffic to allow you to merge and flash their headlights to indicate you can turn across in front of them.  This is the reverse of what one can expect in Australia.  I can only assume the size of the country and the density of the traffic has created this cooperative approach.  However I do need to work out some of the speed signs. I believe open road dual lane speed 60 and motorways are 70.  However I have yet to work out the meaning of the white disk with the diagonal black stripe and I’m not sure of the maximum speed on unmarked single lane roads.

9 comments :

Anonymous said...

Hello Tom

The white disk you mention is the national speed limit sign, the national speed limit is 60mph. Caroline

Paul and Elaine said...

Im with you on the driving, I love driving in the UK especially on the motorways where they understand lane discipline. Pretty sure diagonal black stripe is 70mph and max speed is 70mph.
I was in China recently and reckon their standard or driving is better than OZ.
Paul

Peter and Margaret said...

Hello again Tom. Uk speed limits vary according to the vehicle you are driving, but for this purpose we will assume a family car. In this case the national speed limit indicated the by national speed limit sign - the white disk with black diagonal stripe, is 60mph, except on a dual, (multi), carriageway where it is 70mph. Motorways are 70mph, unless indicated otherwise by a mandatory speed limit sign - circular disk with red surround indicating speed limit. These have recently been introduced on motorway gantries, as illuminated, changeable signs, usually with a speed camera behind them. They are said to be there to control traffic flow at busy times, but can be confusing, as they have the potential to change at each gantry, with the potential also of the speed camera catching you out. Urban areas are 30mph, unless indicated otherwise by the mandatory speed limit sign, and single carriageway open roads, usually identified as being "open", non-urban, by the lack of street lighting, are national speed limit (60mph), unless indicated otherwise by signing, although they should have the white disk / black diagonal stripe to indicate this. Beware urban 20mph limits, always signed, but often accompanied with a camera, either fixed or mobile occasionally. Urban areas can be 40mph with signing, but this often changes along the road length, accompanied by cameras, and sparse singing. If in doubt, stick to 30mph. Some more cynical types might just think in these circumstances that the cameras are there just to make money! Always watch out for "specs" cameras. Often used on motorways, always at roadworks. These are on tall posts, in pairs, painted yellow, and use numberplate recognition technology to measure average speed, so slowing down if you spot one doesn't necessarily work! (Similar looking blue ones on motorway bridges, are just traffic flow monitors and not speed cameras!) On a lighter note, during my police advanced driver training, the national speed limit sign was known to us as the "GLF" sign. Work it out for yourself!

Tom and Jan said...

Thanks for all the advice regarding the maximum speed limit. From now on any tickets (I hope not.... please) will be deserved!

Nb Caxton said...

Hi Tom and Jan
Floyd and Fletcher send you their thanks for making them international stars and I see the bribe about their good behaviour worked!
I have added you to my blog list - best wishes for the boat build...
Lesley

Tom and Jan said...

Hi Lesley,
We can only say how impressed we were with the behaviour of two of your lads! Can't comment on the behaviour of the third lad :-)

Crew: Mike, Mags, Poppy and Abbey said...

Hello Tom.

Speed limits are maximum and not a minimum to aim for. So always drive within your ability and the prevailing road conditions.

I have Just done a 250 mile round trip on the motorway. Spray was very bad and the majority of drivers were doing 50/55 mph because of the conditions.

There are always those that feel obliged to do 70. We saw three accidents with long tailbacks of traffic on opposite carriageway.

On a couple of sections the gantry speeds were as low as 40 mph. Was not a good day to be out on the roads.

The word verification for this posting is "ranter" does someone know somthing about me.

Regards Mick -n- Mags.

Tom and Jan said...

All sound advice.

We have just returned from a day out and carefully kept within a safe driving speed for the conditions.

Elly and Mick said...

Ditto on the driving manners in the UK. It's so much more pleasant than the impatient driving here in Oz. I always think it's because in the UK everyone is forced to be more patient with all those roundabouts and narrow winding roads through villages. Here in Oz we are used to wide open roads.

I did notice on my first (and only!) time driving out of London that those drivers seemed much more like what I'm used to at home. Honking horns if you aren't quick enough taking off at traffic lights and even tailgating when I slowed a little looking for which street to turn into. It wasn't a pleasant experience and I wouldn't want to repeat it.

Elly